Cover
Traditional
Traditional

Song Information

Origin: Traditional (Appalachia, Southeast, late 1800's) This old train song goes by many names. It may be a combination of a couple songs that now are known as Reuben's Train. It was known as Train 45, which closely resembles the traditional tunes Nine Hundred Miles and Rain and Snow. First release as I'm Nine Hundred Miles Away from Home by Fiddlin' John Carson (1924) First recorded as Train 45 by Grayson & Whitter (1927) Released as Old Ruben by Doc Watson, Gaither Carlton (1961) Released as Reuben's Train by Dock Boggs (1970)

Lyrics

Ol' Reuben made a train and he put it on a track He ran it to the Lord knows where Oh me, oh my, ran it to the Lord knows where Shoulda been in town when Reuben's train went down You could hear that whistle blow a hundred miles Oh me, oh my, you could hear the whistle blow a hundred miles Last night I lay in jail had no money to go my bail Lord how it sleeted and it snowed Oh me, oh my, Lord how it sleeted and it snowed I've been to the East, I've been to the West I'm going where the chilly winds don't blow Oh me, oh my, I'm going where the chilly winds don't blow Oh, the train that I ride is a hundred coaches long You can hear the whistle blow a hundred miles Oh me, oh my, you can hear the whistle blow a hundred miles I got myself a blade, laid Reuben in the shade I'm startin' me a graveyard of my own Oh, me, oh, lordy my, startin' me a graveyard of my own Ol' Reuben made a train and he put it on a track He ran it to the Lord knows where Oh me, oh my, ran it to the Lord knows where